programme

A Philosophical Perspective for Education

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Course TypeCourse CodeNo. Of Credits
Foundation CoreSES2011112

Semester and Year Offered: semester II (Winter semester)

Course Coordinator and Team: Dr.Nivdita Sarkar (Coordinator)

Taught by Dr. JayshreeMathur (Adjunct Faculty)

Email of course coordinator: niveditasarkar@aud.ac.in

Pre-requisites: The course builds on the introductory philosophy of education course offered in Semester I of the MA Education Programme.

Course Description:

This course is designed to provide an orientation to the students of education to the nature of knowledge and knowing, and enable students to critically reflect on the meaningfulness of educational concepts. Further, since education is normative in nature, the issues and questions it raises require a normative inquiry. A study of ethics and other axiological issues would equip the student with the mode and method of inquiry. The questions of knowledge and morality in education will be contextualized discussed with reference to the democratic values of freedom, equality, and social justice

Course Objectives:

  • To understand the basic concepts and the nature of knowledge and knowing
  • To critically reflect on the meaningfulness of educational concepts
  • To recognize various concepts ofethics and other axiological issues
  • To contextualise the concepts of knowledge and morality

 

Course Outcomes: One completion of this course

  1. The students will be able to recognize and understand of the nature and forms of knowledge in differing philosophical perspectives.
  2. The students will be able identify the difference between rationalist tradition Experience and the empiricist tradition in the context of knowledge.
  3. The students will be able to problematize the concepts values of equality, justice, freedom and liberty in context of ethics.
  4. The students will be able to make linkages between ideas of morality within and without religion

 

Brief description of the units:

Unit 1 Epistemology: Knowledge and Knowing

An understanding of the nature and forms of knowledge in differing philosophical perspectives would give the students a horizon which would help them see what is accepted and valued as knowledge and why. The epistemological categories chosen to this end (as delineated below) introduce the student to differences in epistemological constructions.

Reason and the rationalist tradition; Experience and the empiricist tradition: in the context of knowledge.

Inference and imagination in learning; Belief and testimony in knowledge formation: in the context of knowing

Unit 2 Ethics

Ethics is a requisite in the study of education as the discipline is normative in nature and the practice is necessarily norm ridden. The major issues in ethics and education center around the freedom and well-being of ‘Man’ and of equality and social justice among people. The essence of living in harmony and beauty lies in how one lives with the other. An ethical perspective will help in the understanding of norms, values and morals which pervade education and where these emanate from. For this purpose the values of equality, justice, freedom and liberty will be studied in an educational perspective. The unit will also bring out the ideas of morality within and without religion. The need for the aesthete in life and education in this context will also be discussed.

Assessment Plan:

S.No

Assessment

Weightage

1

Assignment-1

50%

2

Assignment-2

50%

 

Readings:

Core Readings:

  • Adler, Jonathan, E. (2006). Knowledge, truth and learning.In Randal Curren (ed.) A companion to the philosophy of education, pp.285-304. Oxford: Blackwell Publishing.
  • Kneller, J. F. (1971). Knowledge and value.In John F. Kneller (ed.) Foundations of education, pp. 212-230. New York, London: John Wiley & Sons.
  • Barrow, Robin and Woods, Ronald (2014).Rationality.In An introduction to philosophy of education (4th edition), 84-97. London and New York: Routledge.
  • Gupta, Bina (2009). Introduction. In Reason and experience in Indian philosophy, pp.3-23.New Delhi: ICPR.
  • Chambliss, J.J. (ed.). (1996). Philosophy of Education: An Encyclopedia. New York and London: Garland Publishing House.
  • Epistemology (pp. 188-191)
  • Experience (pp. 210-213)
  • Ruitenberg, Claudia and Vokey, Daniel (2010).Equality and justice. In Richard Bailey, Robin Barrow, David Carr and Christine McCarthy (eds.) The SAGE Handbook of Philosophy of Education, pp. 401-414. Los Angeles: Sage
  • Chambliss, J.J. (ed.) (1996). Philosophy of Education: An Encyclopedia. New York and London: Garland Publishing House.
  • Ethics (199-203), Aesthetics (9-11)
  • Miri, Mrinal (2014). Philosophy, value and education.In Philosophy and education, 1-24. New Delhi: Oxford University Press.
  • Miri, Mrinal (2014). Morality and moral training.In Philosophy and education, 94-118. New Delhi: Oxford University Press.
  • Hamm, Cornell (1979). Moral education without religion. In D.B. Cochrane, C.M. Hamm & A.C. Kazepides (eds.), The domain of moral education, pp. 35-45. Toronto: OISE; New York: Paulist Press. by Hamm, C. and Daniels, L.B. (1979).Moral education in relation to values education. In D.B. Cochrane, C.M. Hamm & A.C. Kazepides (eds.), The domain of moral education, pp. 17-34. Toronto: OISE; New York: Paulist Press.
  • Mukherjee, H.B. (2013). Aesthetic education, 230-235. In Education for fullness: A study of the educational thought and experiment of Rabindranath Tagore. New Delhi: Routledge.
  • Greene, Maxine (1971). The aesthetic component.In John F. Kneller (ed.) Foundations of education, pp. 289-310. New York, London: John Wiley & Sons.

 

Supplementary Readings:

  • Carr, David (2003). Making sense of education: An introduction to the philosophy and theory of education and teaching. London, NY: Routledge.
  • Peters, R.S. (1966). Ethics and education. London: George Allen & Unwin Ltd. (Equality, pp. 117-144; Freedom, pp.179-207)
  • Winch, C. and Gingell, J. (eds.) (2004).Key concepts in the Philosophy of Education. London and New York: Routledge.