programme

Language and Literacy Instructions

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Course TypeCourse CodeNo. Of Credits
Foundation CoreSES2031034

Semester and Year Offered: Monsoon Semester, 2019

Course Coordinator and Team: Dr Sunita Singh (course coordinator), and Monal M. Dewle

Email of course coordinator: sunitasingh@aud.ac.in

Pre-requisites: It is desirable that the participants have work experience as schoolteachers

Aims/Outline:

In the recent decade, the status of reading levels of young children in the country has gained widespread attention. The outcry of “low learning levels” in the country and especially the low scores in reading assessment in large-scale surveys has brought to the forefront the shifting rhetoric towards outcome based performance. However, the strategies used to teach literacy in classrooms predominantly remain focused on round robin reading, rote memorisation and copywriting. In order to address this challenge, different schemes are introduced by different agencies that create provisions for additional time for reading instruction, availability of materials and some strategies for identifying children. There is little focus on the strategies actually used by the teachers in the classrooms in addressing issues of students who struggle with reading. Engaging with this context, this course begins with providing an overview of the language and literacy instruction in the Indian context—exploring the complexities of social, curricular and linguistic contexts. It will provide an overview of the dominant approaches to language and literacy instruction and familiarise students with the aims and principles of the same. Finally, it will provide specific strategies for teaching literacy in inclusive classrooms.

Course Outcomes:

By the end of this course the participants will be able to:

  1. Acquire a variety of teaching strategies and techniques integrating reading, writing, listening, speaking, and viewing activities
  2. Plan and implement a variety of literacy strategies for all students
  3. Plan a literacy learning center

 

Brief description of modules/ Main modules:

Module 1: Contexts of language and literacy instruction (6 hours):

This module will provide an overview of the curricular, teacher education and developmental contexts of teaching language and literacy in India. The diversities of languages and script and ways of teaching literacy have contributed to the practices in the classrooms. This module will focus on examining the current contexts of classrooms to understand how diverse languages spoken by the children and their cultures and identities play a role in instruction.

Module 2: Principles and Approaches to Language and Literacy (6 hours):

This module will introduce students to some approaches to language and literacy instruction that have been prevalent in the field. It will focus on: Phonics, whole language and balanced/comprehensive literacy; aims of language and literacy; and principles and approaches of language and literacy instruction

Module 3: Literacy Strategies for Classrooms (12 hours):

This module will focus on the modes and functions of literacy across the curriculum and the various skills that children need in order to be able to interpret texts and also compose independently. For teachers, this implies that the children need to become familiar with diverse ways of understanding literacy and literacy across disciplines. The module will focus on the strategies and skills children need to know in order to read a text.

Module 4: Literature and Content Area texts (12 hours):

The module will focus on understanding how literacy could be used across the content areas. It will highlight the use of children’s literature and content area texts. It will also include engaging with the use of textbooks with children and ways of assessment.

Module 5: Writing in classrooms (12 hours):

This module will focus on the process of writing for children for both, narrative and expository texts. The composing process is a powerful source to enable children to learn. While the processes of reading and writing are integrally connected, classrooms practices indicate that little attention is paid to writing in the classrooms. However, this is not to assume that the relationship between reading and writing is simple and linear. It is critical that writing be organised in the classroom to support reading processes.

Assessment Details with weights:

  1. Attendance and participation: (10%)
  2. Strategies for a text for a diverse group of students: (25%)
  3. Literacy center: (25%)
  4. Case study of a child’s literacy development: (40%)

 

Reading List:

  • Early Language & Literacy Position Paper (2016). https://www.careindia.org/sites/default/files/ELL%20India%20%28revised%20pdf%29.pdf. CECED and CARE India Section 3. Contexts which frame children’s language and literacy; pages 16-24.
  • Singh, P. K. (2014). Nurturing Linguistic Diversity in Jharkhand. Economic & Political Weekly,
  • 49(51), 17-19
  • Early Language & Literacy Position Paper (2016). https://www.careindia.org/sites/default/files/ELL%20India%20%28revised%20pdf%29.pdf. CECED and CARE India
  • Section 4: Aims of language and literacy education; pages 25-26
  • Section 6. Approaches to language and literacy; pages 32-38.
  • Baumann, J. F., Hoffman, J. V., Moon, J., & Duffy-Hester, A. M. (1998). Where are teachers' voices in the phonics/whole language debate? Results from a survey of US elementary classroom teachers. The Reading Teacher, 51(8), 636-650.
  • Bender, W. N., & Larkin, M. J. (2009). Reading strategies for elementary students with learning difficulties: Strategies for RTI. Corwin Press.Chapter 2: Phonological and phonemic instruction: A key to early reading and literacy (pp. 33-61)Chapter 3: Phonics and Word Attack Strategies (pp. 63-112).
  • Early Language & Literacy Position Paper (2016). https://www.careindia.org/sites/default/files/ELL%20India%20%28revised%20pdf%29.pdf. CECED and CARE India
  • Section 5: Essential aspects of early language and literacy development; pages 27-32.
  • Jayaram, K (2008). Early Literacy Project – explorations and reflections part 1: Theoretical perspectives, Contemporary Education Dialogue, (5) 2, pp133-174.
  • Bean, T. W., Readence, J. E., & Baldwin, R. S. (2011). Content area literacy: An integrated approach. Kendall Hunt Publishing Company
  • Chapter 7. Literature (pp. 143-176)
  • Bender, W. N., & Larkin, M. J. (2009). Reading strategies for elementary students with learning difficulties: Strategies for RTI. Corwin Press.
  • Chapter 6: Reading comprehension in the content areas (pp. 197-228).
  • Brozo, W. G., Moorman, G., Meyer, C., & Stewart, T. (2013). Content area reading and disciplinary literacy: A case for the radical center. Journal of Adolescent & Adult Literacy, 56(5), 353-357.
  • Moss, B. (2005). Making a case and a place for effective content area literacy instruction in the elementary grades. The Reading Teacher, 59(1), 46-55.
  • Gunning, T. G. (2008). Developing higher-level literacy in all students: Building reading, reasoning, and responding. Pearson/Allyn and Bacon.
  • Chapter10: Using writing to improve higher-level literacy skills.
  • Tompkins, G. E., & Jones, P. D. (2008). Teaching writing: Balancing process and product. Pearson/Merrill Prentice Hall.

 

Additional Reference:

  • Bhattacharya, R. (2017). ‘Speaking of food: Apple..ice-cream…posto…pesta..roti…’ In R. K. Agnihotri, A.S. Gupta & A. L. Khanna (Eds.), Trends in Language Teaching, pp. 82-97. Orient BlackSwan: Hyderabad.
  • Jayaram, K. (2017). Linguistic and cultural diversity and language teaching—with a specific focus on the teaching of reading and writing to young learners. In R. K. Agnihotri, A.S. Gupta & A. L. Khanna (Eds.), Trends in Language Teaching, pp. 57-70. Orient BlackSwan: Hyderabad.
  • National Council of Educational Research and Training. (2005). National Focus Group on Teaching of English.Position Paper. New Delhi. Retrieved from http://www.ncert.nic.in/new_ncert/ncert/rightside/links/pdf/focus_group/english.pdf
  • National Council of Educational Research and Training. (2005). National Focus Group on Teaching of Indian Languages.Position Paper. New Delhi. Retrieved from http://www.ncert.nic.in/new_ncert/ncert/rightside/links/pdf/focus_group/Indian_Languages.pdf
  • Mohanty, K. (2006). Multilingualism of the unequals and predicaments of education in India: Mother tongue or other tongue? In O. Garcia, T. Skutnabb-Kangas, & M. E. Torres-Guzman.Imagining multilingual schools. pp. 262-279. Clevedon: Multilingual Matters.
  • Bean, T. W., Readence, J. E., & Baldwin, R. S. (2011).Content area literacy: An integrated approach. Kendall Hunt Publishing Company (pp. 2-10).Chapter 1: Content area literacy: Developing 21st century learners (pp.5-16 ).
  • Gunning, T. G. (2008).Developing higher-level literacy in all students: Building reading, reasoning, and responding. Pearson/Allyn and Bacon.Chapter 1. Higher level literacy skills needed in today’s world and the world of the future
  • Harrison, C. (1999). When scientists don’t agree: the case for balanced phonics.Reading, 33(2), 59-63.
  • Wells, G. (1999). Dialogic inquiry: Towards a socio-cultural practice and theory of education. Cambridge University Press.
  • Bender, W. N., & Larkin, M. J. (2009).Reading strategies for elementary students with learning difficulties: Strategies for RTI. Corwin Press.
  • Chapter 4: Strategies for building vocabulary and reading fluency (pp. 113-154).
  • Chapter 5: Gaining meaning from reading (pp. 155-196)
  • Ministry of Human Resource Development. (2014). Padhe Bharat Bhade Bharat: Early reading and writing with comprehension & early mathematics programme.
  • Retrieved from: http://ssa.nic.in/pabminutes-documents/Padhe%20Bharat%20Badhe%20Bharat.pdf
  • National Council for Educational Research and Training &SarvSikshaAbhiyan: Learning outcomes at elementary stage. Retrieved from:
  • http://mhrd.gov.in/sites/upload_files/mhrd/files/Learning_outcomes.pdf
  • National Council for Educational Research and Training (2013).Mathura Pilot Project Report.Retrieved from http://www.ncert.nic.in/departments/nie/dee/publication/pdf/FINALETS10.12.13.pdf
  • Sinha, S. (2012). Reading without meaning: The dilemma of Indian classrooms. Language and Language Teaching, 1(1), 22-26.
  • Strickland, D. S., & Morrow, L. M. (Eds.). (2000). Beginning reading and writing (Vol. 50). Teachers College Press.
  • Kumar, K. (2004). What is worth teaching?.OrientBlackswan.“Textbooks and educational culture”.
  • Kumar, K. shikshaaurbaalsahitya. Sandarbh, 80, 35-48.
  • http://www.eklavya.in/pdfs/Sandarbh/Sandarbh_80/35-48_Education_And_Children_Literature.pdf
  • Rosenblatt, L. M. (1982). "The literary transaction: Evocation and response." Theory into Practice,21(4), 268-277.
  • Rosenblatt, L. M. (1991). Literature—SOS!.Language Arts, 68(6), 444-448.
  • Shanahan, T., & Shanahan, C. (2008). Teaching disciplinary literacy to adolescents: Rethinking content-area literacy. Harvard Educational Review, 78(1), 40-59.
  • Volin, E. V. A. (2011). Good comics for kids collecting graphic novels for young readers.Children & Libraries: The Journal of the Association for Library Service to Children, 9(1), 3-10.
  • Bean, T. W., Readence, J. E., & Baldwin, R. S. (2011).Content area literacy: An integrated approach. Kendall Hunt Publishing Company.
  • Chapter 11. Writing, pp. 269-304.
  • Chapter 12. Studying and preparing for examinations, pp. 305-336
  • Fletcher, R., &Portalupi, J. (2001).Writing workshop. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann.